Grove Riding School

GroveStables_featured

What’s it all about?

Grove Riding School sits between Marlow and High Wycombe and is home to a very large number of riding stable and privately owned horses. I’m listing it here as a ‘mini trip’ with your young child to see and experience the horses rather than as a place to come and ride (although it is a great place for riding lessons and they offer lots of fun children focused ‘own a pony days’ etc for kids). 

We turn up with a small bag of cut up carrots and apples (finger strips carrots and apple wedges). We park up and then find someone that works at the stables and ask them if it’s ok if we walk around and give the horses some carrots. They may show you which horses you can feed and which not to. It’s important to ask but I have always found this to be fine. The horses are in their stables in the barns so you can walk down the aisles distributing carrots to very pleased horses! 

There is generally a large yard dog running loose. He/she may run up to you to say hello but in my experience, has been not at all overbearing even for small toddlers. He/she says hello and then carries on.  There is often tractors to see and sometimes the farrier shoeing the horses which my boys are fascinated in watching! 

The picture I have shown shows and aisle of large horses but there are lots of small ponies too!

Where/When

The stables are open Tuesdays to Sundays during working hours. Depending on the day and time of year the horses may be in the stables or out in the fields. In winter they will be in more than in the summer. I tend to go mid afternoon but if you want to be sure of there being horses in to see you are best to ring ahead.


More information

Phone: 01494 881939
Email: info@groveridingschool.co.uk
http://www.groveridingschool.co.uk/

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1 week ago

The Grove Riding School

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Morning all, yet again our office has flooded 🙄 so we are unable to process card payments today. Apologies. ... See MoreSee Less

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Looking forward to our groundwork and introducing trick training sessions at The Grove Riding School later today. Lovely day for it! ... See MoreSee Less

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As part of the National Horseball Weekend we will be running a have a go session at 3pm on Saturday 19th.!! Limited spaces available so priority will be given to newcomers to the sport but all welcome to apply.
£30 for the hour session inc horse hire.National #HaveAGoAtHorseball Weekend in association with the Association Of British Riding Schools!

Are you an ABRS approved centre wanting to get involved?

Are you a qualified BHA Coach wanting to get involved?

Are you a rider wanting to get involved?

GET IN TOUCH FOR MORE INFO!!

Saturday 19th - Sunday 20th October 2019!

NATIONWIDE HORSEBALL!

Get tagging/sharing your Riding School!

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#Horseball #ForTheLoveOfTheSport #TheFutureIsHorseball
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Delighted to welcome High Wycombe RDA to the grove, please share.Volunteers needed! New RDA sessions are starting after half term at The Grove Riding School, and we would love to welcome some more helpers to support our riders. If you have some time free on a Wednesday afternoon (1.30-3pm, starting 6 Nov) and would like to get involved, please email sarah.bacon39@googlemail.com. ... See MoreSee Less

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National #HaveAGoAtHorseball Weekend in association with the Association Of British Riding Schools!

Are you an ABRS approved centre wanting to get involved?

Are you a qualified BHA Coach wanting to get involved?

Are you a rider wanting to get involved?

GET IN TOUCH FOR MORE INFO!!

Saturday 19th - Sunday 20th October 2019!

NATIONWIDE HORSEBALL!

Get tagging/sharing your Riding School!

www.facebook.com/events/735010550250340/

#Horseball #ForTheLoveOfTheSport #TheFutureIsHorseball
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We love having Ryeview to visit and the results are truly incredible. ... See MoreSee Less

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Thought I'd get in early on my anti over rugging campaign this year. #horsesnotpeopleTIME TO RUG YOUR HORSE?

As the overnight temperatures dip to ~10°c we are pulling out the fleeces and jumpers from our Winter clothes drawers! Should we do the same for our horses? If they are fit, healthy, unclipped and in good body condition then maybe not just yet or only the lightest rug! We should not judge what “clothing” our horses need based on how we feel for two very good reasons. The first is of course that the horse has a fur coat. The second, is that due to its size the horse does not lose heat as rapidly as we do. So at the same temperature the horse will feel warmer than we do!

* Horses are very adaptable to different climates
Horses are incredibly adaptable when it comes to climate and are found in both some of the hottest and the coldest places on earth ranging from -40°C to 60°C. Being warm-blooded the horse tries to keep its central (core) temperature as close to 38°C as possible. However, in very cold climates the extremities of the body such as the feet may fall as low as 5-10°C or reach as high as 60°C when standing on hot sand.

* What determines how cold a horse feels?
In simple terms the horse will feel cold or hot when the air temperature falls below 0°C (the lower critical temperature - LCT) or rises above 25°C (the upper critical temperature). This is known as the horses' thermoneutral zone – within this range its easy for the horse to control its body temperature by simply opening and closing blood vessels in the skin to lose or retain heat “carried” in the blood. Outside these temperatures the horse must use other means to keep warm or cool. At temperatures above 25°C the horse may increase its heart rate to circulate more blood to the skin, more blood vessels in the skin may open, the horse may also start to increase its respiratory rate and it may start to sweat. In addition, the horse may also change its behaviour, for example seeking shade or walking into water. When the temperature drops below 0°C the horse needs to keep heat in. It may do this by increasing its metabolic rate (effectively turning up its central heating and using more fuel), seeking shelter from wind and or rain, letting its limbs drop to a lower temperature by reducing how much blood flows through them and if it gets really cold, by shivering. However, this range changes between Summer and Winter and horse may have a lower range in Winter once they become used to cold weather or cold acclimatised.

In contrast, for an unclothed person, the lower critical temperature is around 25°C!!!

So a horses body temperature is a balance between how much heat is being produced and how much is being lost. If its cold, then the horse loses heat more rapidly and must increase its heat production and or decrease its heat loss (by letting its extremities get colder) to prevent its temperature falling.

* What determines how much heat is lost and how much energy a horse needs to use to keep warm?

-Weather
The colder the air temperature the bigger the difference between the horses surface (skin or coat) temperature and the air and the faster heat moves from hot to cold. This is known as convective heat loss. Add in wind and the heat is lost even faster by the process of forced convection or what we refer to as the “wind-chill” factor. Add in rain and it will feel even colder. Even in Winter we gain heat some heat from the sun. This is easy to feel on a Winters day when then sun goes behind clouds. So the coldest condition are low air temperature, strong winds and rain.

-Size
Its easy to lose heat if you are small and hard to lose heat if you are big. Large animals usually have the advantage in cold climates whilst small animals are better off in hot climates. As we have already said, the horse is unusual in that it can survive and even thrive in extremes of climate. And some breeds cope better with cold than others, but in general larger horses retain heat better than smaller ones.

-Age
As with people, young and old horses and ponies are likely to cope less well with the cold. Young horses are smaller and often have less bodyfat and will lose heat more rapidly. Older horses have a reduced ability to control their body temperature, may have lower body fat, may have health problems, reduced digestive efficiency and be less active which can all contribute to them being more at risk in cold weather.

-Condition/Bodyfat
A horse with a high BCS (body condition score) and a large amount of fat will be better insulated and need less rugging.

-Diet
Heat production is greater on high fibre diets compared with high starch and or high oil based diets. Horses and ponies living out in very cold climates such as in Canada in Winter are able to maintain body condition if they have unlimited access to good quality forage. Increased addition of energy to the diet should only really be necessary when the average temperature drops below 0°C for several weeks or for young horses and ponies or for older horses or ponies or those in poor condition.

-Breed
The “rounder” or more “compact” shape of some breeds may help them to retain heat in cold weather, for example cobs would have an advantage over “finer” breeds such as Arabs.

-Coat
The horses coat keeps it warm by trapping air between the hairs. When the coat gets wet the hairs collapse and less air is trapped leading to faster heat loss. Clearly whether or not a horse has a thick winter coat, has not yet grown one or has been clipped will have a big effect on the ability to retain heat. We have always considered that changes from Summer to Winter coat occur as a result of both daylength and temperature. A recent study in Poland found evidence that air temperature rather than daylight appeared to have the strongest influence on development of Winter coat.

-Shelter
Again, studies have shown that even in severely cold weather, provided shelter and good quality unlimited forage are provided, mature horses in good condition can maintain their body condition. One interesting consideration with respect to shelter and stables is that stone shelters or stables will “draw” heat from horses by a process known as radiation so whilst a horse may not need a rug in a wooden stable the radiant heat loss in a stone stable may mean that the same horse would benefit from a rug. This is not any easy concept but in the same way that the Sun radiates heat to us on Earth, in the stable the horse becomes the equivalent of the Sun and radiates (loses) heat to colder surfaces.

-Individual Variation
Just like ourselves, some horse cope better with cold than others. So whilst there are general rules, its still important to observe the individual horse. The LCT (Lower Critical Temperature) does vary both within and between breeds e.g. 1.4˚C to 10.8°C for ponies; –2.1˚C to 7.9°C for Thoroughbreds; –3.4˚C to 7.4°C for Warmbloods.

* Why do we use rugs?
There are several main reasons why we use rugs on our horses at this time of year: to keep them warm; to keep them dry; to keep them clean. If they get wet they lose more heat. If we keep them rugged we can clip them which reduces the risk of over-heating during training or competition and makes them easier to clean off.

* How does the horse lose heat from its body?
1) Heat lost in breath
2) Heat lost in faeces and urine
3) Heat lost from the skin/coat surface
4) Heat lost by contact with colder surfaces, such as the ground
5) Heat lost by radiation to colder surfaces
6) Heat lost by sweating

* Is how warm or cold we feel a good guide to whether we should rug our horses?
No, we lose heat more rapidly than horses. We will feel cold when horses still feel comfortable. Our thermo neutral zone (when naked) is 25-30°C – much higher and much narrower than that of the horse (0-25°C).

* Risks of rugging or over-rugging?
1) Rubbing, especially if causing horse to sweat. Sweating causes the skin to become hyper-hydrated (the effect you get when you stay in the bath too long) and more prone to damage and infection.
2) Rugs and stabling prevent sunlight reaching the skin which is necessary for generation of Vitamin D. Prevention of sunlight reaching the skin and generating Vitamin D. Vitamin D is involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus in bone and deficiency can lead to decreased bone strength. Sufficient sunlight penetrates through the coat to generate Vitamin D but not through Winter rugs.
3) The horse uses a considerable amount of energy to keep warm. If the horse is too heavily rugged then less energy is lost and will be deposited as fat leading to weight gain. Conversely, horses with short coats and little body fat on borderline energy intake will lose weight in colder weather.

* What thickness of rug should I use?
A horses Winter coat when dry and clean has been estimated to have a Tog rating of around 1-2. So if we consider that a Summer duvet has a Tog rating of 4.5 then this would already be increasing the insulation of the horse by a factor of 2-3 times. Some really thick rugs may well approach a Tog rating of 15 which would only likely be needed by sick newborn foals or very thin old horses in extremely cold weather!

* How to decide when to rug
-Don’t rug horses based on how cold you feel!
-Older horses, young horses, thin horses and clipped horses will need rugs first
-For most horses (unless clipped and living out 24/7) rugs should not be considered before temperatures overnight begin dipping towards 5°C.
-Ideally start with lighter rugs and move to thicker rugs as it gets colder.
-After a month of cold weather your horse may be able to swap back to a thinner rug once its acclimatised
-Try to avoid having rugs on all day when turned out to allow for some Vitamin D formation – an hour a day exposure without a rug should be sufficient.
-Feeling your horses’ legs, face or ears is a poor indicator of how warm it is. Placing your hand under the rug behind the withers is a good spot. If it feels cold then you may want to consider a thicker rug. If it feels damp then you may want to consider removing the rug as its likely your horse is too warm.
-Horses without access to field shelters will need thicker rugs as the temperature drops.
-Remember that wind and cold and rain will induce the greatest heat loss.
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